1/32 Revell Hawker Hunter F.Mk.6 – Build Log

2nd January 2015

My modelling New Years resolution for 2015 is to keep my build queue at no more than 3 builds at a time! Last year I got up to 8 builds on the go, and as a result I finished my 1/48 Tamiya SHAR in June, and then didn’t complete another kit until December! As it was, in December 2014 I completed 3 builds which made up for it a bit, but still 8 active builds equates to my entire years output of kits all being built at once.

So now that I’ve managed to clear my build queue somewhat, I decided to dust off the 1/32 Revell Hunter, make a start on the filling and sanding and end up with it covered in dust again, although this time sanding dust and not lazy dust.

 

So, on with the fettling!

 

The spine didn’t need too much attention, the seam was fairly small so where it showed it got a daub of black gloop*.

*The black gloop is MEK Poly into which I dissolved a large amount of black sprue.

[UPDATE: After a bit of use I found the black gloop formula to be not so good. When cured and sanded it contained a lot of air bubbles and voids. It also seemed to set harder than the surrounding plastic which made re-scribing difficult. I now use a different concoction based on white Styrene sheet dissolved in Mr Cement-S thin glue which works better.]
1

 

Moving onto the nose cone, I gave this a bit of a sand and it showed up a dark grey streak down the centre telling me that there is a flat spot there.

I don’t remember sanding the nose before, although it has been 8 months since I last worked on this kit, so perhaps I was a bit over zealous with a sanding stick in a previous life!?

2

 

Well, it’s a daub of the black gloop for you me-laddo!

[UPDATE: After a bit of use I found the black gloop formula to be not so good. When cured and sanded it contained a lot of air bubbles and voids. It also seemed to set harder than the surrounding plastic which made re-scribing difficult. I now use a different concoction based on white Styrene sheet dissolved in Mr Cement-S thin glue which works better.]

3

 

The black gloop tends to need to cure over night to go properly solid (to the point where you can’t dent it with a finger nail), so while that happens it’s time to look at the underneath fuselage seam.

There’s a lot of panel detail along the lower seam, so to allow me to remember where all the lines are I’ve given the seam a liberal coating of Flory Dark Dirt wash.

When it’s dry I’ll wipe it off making the existing panel lines prominent enough to be photographed. I can then use the photos as a reference when I re-scribe the lines back in after sanding and filling…

4

 

And by the magic of television, the wash has been wiped off and here’s my reference shots that I’ll use when scribing the lines back in…

5a

 

And another shot, a little more forward this time.

BTW I could have used the panel line layout as shown in the instructions, but for this kit the panel line layout in the instructions is different to that on the model. So better to use the model layout as my reference rather than try to follow the instructions.

6

 

The underside got a sanding and a few areas of seam needed the black gloop treatment. Once this has cured it can be sanded and polished up.

[UPDATE: After a bit of use I found the black gloop formula to be not so good. When cured and sanded it contained a lot of air bubbles and voids. It also seemed to set harder than the surrounding plastic which made re-scribing difficult. I now use a different concoction based on white Styrene sheet dissolved in Mr Cement-S thin glue which works better.]

7

 

Moving onto the wingtips, these are perhaps the weakest point of the kit from a quality point of view.

The wingtips and leading edges of the wings come as separate pieces (refer to earlier in the build log for specifics), and unfortunately they don’t go together perfectly.

The fit isn’t too bad, but bad enough that it will require some filling, sanding and re-scribing. Shame really as they put some nice rivet detail on there that will need to be re-done.

 

BTW I’m going to do one wing at a time. That way I can obliterate the detail on one wing if I need to, and use the untouched wing as a reference for re-scribing the other.

 

First up a large gap has been filled with some styrene sheet.

8

 

The surface got a sanding to level all the pieces up.

Then a coat of the black gloop to fill in any divots and gaps.

[UPDATE: After a bit of use I found the black gloop formula to be not so good. When cured and sanded it contained a lot of air bubbles and voids. It also seemed to set harder than the surrounding plastic which made re-scribing difficult. I now use a different concoction based on white Styrene sheet dissolved in Mr Cement-S thin glue which works better.]

To the left of the photo below you can see that the seam line running from top left to bottom right where the leading edge attaches is white. This has been filled with Perfect Plastic Putty (PPP).

I find PPP is, well, perfect for gap filling such as this. I just work the PPP into the seam using a small oil painting palette knife, quickly remove any excess before it dries with a damp cotton bud, and finally run over the seam with an almost wet cotton bud to smooth over the joint. Most seams can be sorted in a single pass like this, although sometimes it’s best to let it dry and run another pass of PPP over it.

9
Finally for this update I filled in the gap around the starboard flap.

The gap here was one of those where in some places the gap looked like a panel line, and in other places it was a hole all the way through.

To fill the holes and make the seam look more like a panel line I worked some PPP into the gaps with a palette knife, and before it dried, wiped off the excess with a damp cotton bud.

Then with a quite wet cotton bud I gave it another wipe over, but this time making sure to work the cotton bud into the gap. This had the effect of hollowing out a bit of filler leaving the seam around the flap slightly recessed. This will allow it to take a wash and give the impression that the flap is a separate part.

10

Next update: More fettling 🙂

Thanks for visiting!

I write this blog for fun, to share what I've learned, and to share my builds with you. If you like what you see here please leave a comment, and head over to facebook and like my page!

Cheers - Rich



6 comments on “1/32 Revell Hawker Hunter F.Mk.6 – Build Log
  1. Macca333 says:

    Bag into modelling after a very long break and I saw this fantastic Hunter build. The hunter was always my favourite aircraft, the last of the beautiful fighters, and so was inspired to have a go. My wife bought me the kit for Christmas and gave me space in the conservatory fo work! I marreid an angle and no you can’t swap her.

    Totally gobsmacked at the quality of this build, if I can get anywhere near it I’ll be over the moon so many thanks for sharing the build with us. Things have certainly moved forward since I was invoved, mind you I do go back to the very first plastic models. The first I built was a Canberra.I won’t say how long ago that was but in those days flying was dangerous and sex was safe.

  2. Richard says:

    Thanks Macca333, it’s a shame they don’t make aircraft with lines like the Hunter any more! The Canberra is another classic jet, will definitely have to build one, one day.

  3. Jamie says:

    I have had my hunter on pause following this , not as good as your self but so many great tips really enjoy an update popping up

    • Richard says:

      Cheers Jamie 🙂 Good to hear you’re enjoying the updates – hopefully the momentum is there now so they should be a bit more regular!

  4. Ken Van Mark says:

    You did a outstanding job on this model..
    It is a pleasure to look at.

  5. Great build, delightful commentary!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*